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My Mother’s Last Day Up and About

Wednesday March 20, 1996, was the last day my mother was up and about on her feet before she took sick with a stroke. It’s hard to believe that today is exactly twenty years now since that sadly unforgettable day. Our lives changed from that day onwards. But through it all I experienced first hand the loving presence and kindness of the Lord Jesus Christ.

At that time in 1996 I was a young teacher who was preparing for the end of the second term. I was teaching a school where second term exams were administered; for some unknown reason I had decided to prepare and type my exams quite ahead of schedule. I was to find out that that was God’s way of helping me to be prepared and have my work out of the way.

I remember the lunch hour on that Wednesday very vividly. At a nearby church I had gone to a 12 o’ clock service. The preacher was a lady who spoke about preparing for God’s blessing by faith. She preached that if you want God to bless you with something–if you want to achieve a goal–don’t wait until it becomes real before you start preparing or living as though it is real. At that time I was thinking of getting my driver’s license. I made up my mind then and there that I would enroll in driving school. I wouldn’t wait for a time when I own a vehicle. I would do it now.

Because it was Wednesday, my local church was having Bible Study. And I went that night. One memory is embedded in my mind from that service. Just as we were about to close, and the final prayer was being prayed, I felt an overpowering sense of God’s presence. I felt backwayrds and landed comfortably on the pew behind of me. That was something that never happened to me unless I was up at the altar.

But God was preparing me.

I got home around 9 o’ clock and a favourite show that my mom and I enjoyed watching was just starting. But I noticed that mommy was not there. I found her in her bedroom. She was sitting on her bed reading the Bible. So I said, “Mommy, look Murder, She Wrote showing and you nar watch.” I can’t remember her exact words, but her response was that she prefers to read the Bible and spend time with God than to watch Murder, She Wrote. Because mommy was had an established routine of praying and reading the Bible at 12 midday and 6 pm daily I did not think too much of the response.

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My mother, Clorita Daniel, and her first grandchild, Kesron, in the 1990s

 

I, however, went in the living room to watch the show. Sometime after, mommy came out and stood behind of me. She said something to make a joke with me and swung her hand playfully as if to give me a clout. I playfully ducked and dodged her hand. Later on I would wish I had allowed mommy to hit me one last time. I should also interject that one of my brothers, Godwin, who was a police officer, came home that same day to spend the night–something that was not a frequent occurence.

After that playful incident mommy went to bed and so did I.

But before I continue let me take you on a flashback to two incidents that happened in the week leading up to this day, Wednesday March 20, 1996. Mommy used to go to the vegetable market in town to sell every Friday. On Friday March 15, 1996, I met her at the bus stop waiting to catch a van to come home. I was of course coming from work. She got  a van. I had to wait because I was “travelling monthly” with a particular van. But I sensed an overwhelming desire to give my mother a $3 which was the passage or bus fare to get home. So as she was getting into the van I handed her the money.

“What this for?” she asked.

“To pay your passage,” I replied.

The second incident happened the day after this. On Saturday March 16, 1996, while mommy was at home, we heard a male voice shouting “Tantie Clorita!” Mommy got up from her seat in the living room and went to se who it was. To her surprise–and mine too–it was one of her nephews from Carriere. The young man was the son of her sister, my “Tantie Dona”. He hadn’t visited in a long time. I can tell that both nephew and aunt were glad to see each other. I watched them talking happily for a long time. Then I went about doing other Saturday morning stuff.

No let’s get back to the night of Wednesday March 20, 1996.

Somewhere in the middle of my usually sweet and comfortable sleep I was awaken by my father’s voice calling me. I went to the voice, still sleepy. I saw Daddy and my police brother trying to pick mommy up from a sitting position on the ground. She had told Daddy that she was going to urinate but didn’t get very far.

The scene had me stunned and I could not quite figure out what was happening; however, we all tried and eventually got her back in bed and laid her on her back. A few minutes after that we saw mommy almost “stretching out” and her eyes rolling back in her head.

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My brother Godwin (R) and I in 1992, after coming back from church

 

If I was never frightened before in my life, I was frightened then. My brother went and opened the top half of the back door in the kitchen. I think he had tears in his eyes.

I went to my room and turned on my stereo, selecting Shirley Caesar’s “He will do it again!” I turned the volume up.

We determined it was best to get mommy to the hospital. I called a neighbour, but when he realized  that mommy couldn’t sit up he advised us to call an ambulance. That we did.

The ambulance came. We got mommy onto the strethcher and into the ambulance. Here is where some bizzare things happened. The ambulance could not start. The driver tried and tried but to no avail. In fact, no lights at all were coming on. There were no ignition lights. There were no headlamp lights. There were no siren lights.

I knew then that Satan was trying to keep my mother away from getting medical help. Then I have to say what happened next was nothing less than a miracle.

The neighbour whom I had called before and who said to get the ambulance, he suddenly showed up. He was a mechanic and was able to get the ambulance’s engine started. But there still was no light on the ambulance. So this God-sent neighbour volunteered to drive in front of the ambulance straight to the hospital. Daddy went with the ambulance.

By the time I got back into the house, I saw it was about five minutes past one in the morning. I went back to sleep.

There were some very scary, sad and lonely times in the days and weeks following. One of which was when the doctor who was looking after mommy in the hospital met me in the capital city, Kingstown, and told me right then and there that I should not expect my mother to come back out of the hospital because she only has a 5% chance of surviving. That news I heard in the middle of a crowded street in Kingstown.

Mommy baked our Christmas cakes that year. Hallelujah.

Mommy came out of the hospital on April 17, 1996. She would go on to live for another eleven years before leaving her earthly body on November 3, 2007.

That time in my life taught me that prayer works, that God is present in trouble and sickness, and that there is a power greater than doctors. I also discovered that a hospital can be a place of healing and recovery; I need not be afraid of hospitals.

During the time mommy was hospitalized I did go to driving school. I got my driver’s license that same year. I reasoned that drastic situations called for drastic measures. If something traumatically bad had happened in life, I will respond by doing something drastically good.

SVG: A Country Politically Divided

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The 2015 general elections are over but the traditional two-party contest has left St Vincent and the Grenadines a politically divided country. The outcome has shown that the governing party, the Unity Labour Party (ULP) was returned to power with 8 seats, while the New Democratic Party (NDP) won the remaining seven seats.

The result is a carbon copy of the 2010 general elections results.

And that is political history being made in St Vincent and the Grenadines. Here is why. On all previous occasions in SVG when a political party won an election with only a one seat majority in parliament, that party has always lost the very next general elections. Even the NDP was counting on history to repeat itself. But history recreated itself instead.

The interesting thing to note is that both parties won the exact seats or constituencies which they won (or lost) in the 2010 general elections.

But the reason for this post is to stress the obvious deterioration in the levels of peaceful campaigning and acceptance of results by the party which has been striving to take the reins of power in St Vincent and the Grenadines, the NDP. Now, before I comment further on my observations on this, I am going to share my own political experiences as an enthusiastic voter when I attained the age of eligibility to cast my ballot.

I first voted in the 1994 general elections. Which party did I vote for? What factors contributed to my decision in 1994 when I was a virgin voter? Well, it goes back to the year 1984, when as a young child I sat on the wooden bench in the backyard kitchen with my mother as she peeled the ground provisions for that day’s lunch. Campaigners from the NDP passed by. They were sharing out the relevant posters and leaflets with the candidates contesting the elections.

It was the first time I was seeing and getting to know who James Mitchel was. “The man who would become prime minister,” according to my mother. And sure enough the NDP won the elections. I was just in Junior 2  at the time(grade 3 today).

Then, courtesy of the Vincentian newspaper and the Government Information Service (GIS) I was able to follow much of the workings of James Mitchel and his ministers. I give them credit for bringing electricity and telephone service to my childhood rural village. I also give them credit for the construction and opening of many, many roads, clinics, post offices and schools across the island. They also  helped many suffering elderly people to finally access pipe borne water right in their own homes.

But as an aspiring student growing up in the 80s and 90s I always felt that the government of the day was not seeing or valuing the human resource potential in the country. I remember thinking just how hard–if not futile–it was to continue one’s education after completing secondary school. And even getting to secondary school was a stressful competition. Just one mark in the then Common Entrance Exam often ended the education pursuits of many ordinary students.

Getting into the sole Form 6 at the St Vincent Grammar School (A’ Level) was another competitive big deal. Throughout all of SVG, only one or two annual scholarships were being given out. And often times, the awardees would have surnames which inferred that their parents already had finances which could have paid their way through university in any case.

Additionally, by 1994 I had begun to feel that our prime minister was somehow taking the country for granted. This conclusion came specifically from more than one Independence Day parade and speech ceremony which James Mitchel would have missed because he was overseas at the time. Yes, leaders need to travel, but certainly you can reschedule or designate someone to take your place when your country’s Independence Day comes around.

Nevertheless, the NDP was being celebrated nationally as the government of choice. But I was learning at school that we had a democratic system. I was not seeing democracy at work if the same party was winning all the general elections. I felt stifled. I felt that NDP owned the country. You should know that in the 1989 general elections the electorate gave ALL the seats in parliament to the NDP.

That in itself was historic!

So for five years, from 1989-1994, St Vincent and the Grenadines had absolutely no opposition in parliament. As young as I was, I realized that was NOT a good situation for any people–not even if you are a supporter of the ruling party. It was in that time that former owner of the Vincentian newspaper, Edgeton Richards, started his weekly column called People’s Parliament, which attempted to be a national opposition voice in the country.

So, with all these experiences, when I voted for that first time in 1994, I voted for an opposition. Now, a sad thing about the electorate’s voting pattern in SVG, is that persons always feel that they must vote for the same party all the time. But I think that kills democracy.

The NDP won the 1994 general elections, quite comfortably I might add. I felt bad but now there were three opposition members in the parliament. Then in 1998 the bell rang again and Vincentians went back to the polls. I voted the opposition because it was evident that the NDP was running out of capital projects, the leader was not an ordinary Vincentian who mixed with commoners, and the human resource continued to be ignored.

But I felt the sense of disappointment, shame of defeat and confinement once again to the political wilderness as a supporter of an opposition party for a further five years.

But whether or not our party won, we all rallied, respected, and rated the country’s prime minister as our prime minister. Then in 2001, sensing that hope was about to give birth to much needed political change, I voted once more for the opposition.

This time the change came.

I recalled that on that night, March 28, 2001, the broadcasters of the results did not say that a new government had come to power in the country. They just ended the broadcast as though nothing significant happened.

Today, in 2015, supporters of the NDP are feeling the agony of political defeat. It is hard to bear. But I know how it feels. In the days leading up to the general elections, I heard a radio announcer on Nice radio, literally cursing, and using the word “hell” in order to campaign for the NDP. I thought how disturbingly sad. The radio was traditionally an instrument of good will. Now, because of politics, people are cursing on it.

Throughout various communities, supporters of the two main parties also seemed ready for a physical battle which could start at any time. In North Leeward, the ULP candidate said that he had to resort to pulling his gun after getting no relief from the throwing of bottles on the roof of a shop where he and his supporters had run to for cover from NDP supporters.

In that same constituency, the NDP candidate, who later retained his seat in the 2015 general elections, declared that there are some places he is afraid to go to hold political meetings.

And do not talk about Sion Hill. The street alone separated the ULP’s red from the NDP’s yellow. It was tit for tat campaigning there. Although the NDP leader retained his seat in that constituency, it was interesting to note that his margin of victory was one of the narrowest in the entire general elections. And he ran against a very young ULP candidate.

The NDP is also claiming that the ULP stole the elections by cheating and so winning the Central Leeward seat, now being represented by Deputy Prime Minister, Sir Luis Straker.

On the morning following the elections, the NDP asked supporters to gather at the Layou Police Station to witness the recount of the votes. I saw a video clip of the leader of the NDP right up in the face of Luis Straker. The atmosphere and the body language, as well as words being spoken, suggested to me that the political leader of the NDP was getting ready to physically hit the ULP’s candidate for Central Leeward, Luis Straker.

Today, NDP supporters are protesting in the capital city, Kingstown, outside the prime minister’s office, hours before the ULP holds a public rally in Kingstown where the portfolio of ministers will be announced. I also heard citizens in Kingstown saying that NDP supporters were talking of shooting individuals, as well as saying that they intend to burn down houses.

Now, having supported a party in opposition in years gone, I know it is painful to see your party still in opposition after an election, but the animalistic verbal utterances are dangerous signs of reaching a political cliff.

And we must remember that active politicians of the two main parties are pretty much like Hollywood movie stars.  They play a certain public role. But whatever the results of elections are, their bread is already buttered (as we would say in our Vincentian culture). The prime minister alluded to the fact that the leader of the opposition (NDP leader) is being paid $180 000 per year. That works out to about $15 000 every month.

Wow!

Politicians are on easy street but it is sad that it is the commoners who are more and more literally ready to kill their fellow Vincentian for a political party. And for most citizens, their individual lives will experience very little visible, measurable or permanent improvement, no matter which party is in government.

The Supervisor of Elections here in SVG just released a statement of her reflection on the 2015 general elections. In it she speaks of being verbally harassed at her office by NDP supporters and their lawyers. She cites an instance where she gave a public figure in the NDP permission to take pictures of one of the ballot boxes during the recount in the Central Leeward constituency, only to find out later that the person used that footage on social media as their evidence that a ballot box was stolen.

The Supervisor of Elections had to be given direct police protection and escort as she moved about to fulfil her duties. In fact, armed police guards had to be deployed when the ballot boxes and other election documents were being transported from their respective constituencies. Such was the case before the leader of the ULP could have been sworn in as the country’s prime minister for a fourth term.

The question is: How many other general elections can St Vincent and the Grenadines peacefully survive in the future? Steps must be taken now to preserve democracy in our electoral system if we are to give future generations any possibility of living in this country.

{The above video shows how one Vincentian news reader reacted when one of the earthquakes struck as the newscast was being recorded.}

 

 

Six earthquakes were reported in the (Eastern) Caribbean on Thursday.

According to a statement from the UWI Seismic Research Centre, the earthquakes occurred North East of Barbados at 07:01am, 7:52am, 11:16am, 11:29am, 11:36am and 12:23pm local time.

“The events were located between latitudes of 13.83°N to 13.99°N and longitudes of 58.51°W to 58.70°W. The Magnitudes ranged from 3.4 to 6.4 and depths from 61km to 111km. These earthquakes were reported felt throughout in Barbados, St. Vincent, Grenada, Dominica, Trinidad and Tobago and Guyana.”

No damage or injuries were reported to the Seismic Research Centre.

Seismologist Dr. Joan Latchman said the faults in the earth are now ready to release the strained energy, causing earthquakes to occur more frequently.

She urged citizens to be prepared for earthquakes of greater Magnitudes as she said people tend to forget that the region is seismically alive.

“We have not seen our largest earthquake for more than a hundred years and we keep saying that we need to be prepared. We need to be prepared at all levels – from the individual to the community, to the region, to the national, to the Eastern Caribbean.”

via Caribbean region struck by 6 earthquakes.

 

Below is my opinion based on the above news release

Actually, during the latter part of last year (2014) over 2o different tremors or earthquakes were recorded in the Eastern Caribbean. The data always show the epicenter to be somewhere NE of Barbados or St Lucia, or within an approximate range of the Windward Islands. It is my opinion that the pressure within the earth’s tectonic plate, just NE of the Eastern Caribbean is reaching a pressure pot release point. Also troubling is the presence of many sleeping volcanoes within the Windward Islands as well.

Here in St Vincent & the Grenadines we last felt a relatively intense earthquake back on Thursday November 29, 2007, at approximately 3 PM. As God’s favour would have had it, although things were thoroughly shaken, there was no human injuries or loss of life. That particular quake registered 7.3 on the Richter scale.

As we are particularly vulnerable to earth movements, we must do the wisely astute thing and put in place community and village-level earthquakes and/or volcanic event responses so as to minimize panic and ensure the greatest possible safety of our ordinary citizens should the Eastern Caribbean suffer an unwanted catastrophic earthquake. Let’s make sure every citizen group knows what to do before, during and after such an event.

 

 

 

Our teachers are dying.

This past school year has recorded an unprecedented number of deaths among teachers in the teaching fraternity here in St. Vincent and the Grenadines. It is quite shocking and frightening actually when I think of this unusually historic occurrence as regards the deaths of so many of my colleagues, some of whom I knew personally, all within the space of several short months. I pray that this trend ends with the ending of the school year.

When I awoke this morning in the lazy comfort of the summer holidays, I checked my phone and saw yet another obituary notification from the St Vincent & the Grenadines Teachers Union that another teacher had died. I quickly looked at the picture and was immediately stunned. The latest deceased teacher was Ray LaBorde. I thought it sadly ironic that news of Ray LaBorde’s death broke on the very morning the annual two weeks summer Teachers Workshop was starting. Ray had helped organize many of these very same workshops in the past.

I knew Ray LaBorde not just as a professional but foremost as a local young man who grew up in the same community I did and who actually taught at the primary school I went to. He didn’t teach me when I was a pupil at the Evesham Methodist School but I believe he was assigned to the teaching staff just about the time I left after passing the Common Entrance examination in the late 1980s.

Ray was more than a teacher of academics and classroom lessons. He was even more a teacher of life’s integral lessons in his home village of Evesham. In fact, one of my last recollections of Ray LaBorde’s activism was a short time before his sudden illness last year when he was a leading organizer in a march and rally designed to help residents take a stand against the deadly gun violence and gang activities which had shown its ugly head in Evesham. The very last time I would see Ray LaBorde alive was at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) at the Milton Cato Memorial Hospital earlier this year.

Eternal rest grant unto him, O Lord.

Another teacher who died this past school year–a couple weeks ago in fact–was Dorette John, a teacher of the Belair Government school, a primary school in the same village where she lived. Fundraising activities were still being planned and executed to assist Dorette John when she died. No doubt, she left us all in shock as was evident from the turnout at her funeral several weeks ago now.

For years Eustace “Slums” Maloney taught children to acquire and appreciate their musical talent in addition to their traditional academic skills. Hailing from the Marriaqua constituency, Eustace “Slums” Maloney taught at schools such as Evesham Methodist School, where undoubtedly he and Ray LaBorde would have worked together over the years.

The sudden deaths of our Vincentian teachers within the past school year has also been particularly unsettling because we got news of the deaths of active school principals as well.

The most recent principal who died was principal of the Dorsetshire Hill Government School, Olive Allen. Now anyone who knows the Dosetshire Hill Government School knows it is a close knit school community. Although its population has been relatively small over the years, families in the Dorsetshire Hill community have persevered, supported and loved Ms Allen and her staff as their own. According to a well placed source close to the school family, even when the Ministry of Education had covertly tried to close or relocate the school population to join another primary school, the parents quickly got wind of this and made it clear to the officials that they would have none of it and so the officials were forced to perish that thought.

The Dorsetshire Hill Government School has also found a place in the heart of Vincentians because it had been adopted by the sole local TV station and so received tangible help and national publicity to assist in its operations. The school is located just adjacent from the SVG TV studios. Even when some teenagers had carried out a bold daylight robbery, depriving a teacher of the school of her vehicle and monies, the TV station made no delay in carrying the incident in its prime time news cast that very night.

The robbers were caught not too long after that.

Ms. Natana McLean is another Vincentian teacher we lost this school year. This young lady taught at the JP Eustace Memorial Secondary School, locally known as the Emmanuel High School in Kingstown. She really died in the prime of her life, possibly carrying many unfulfilled dreams and aspirations with her to eternity.

The teacher I am about to reflect on now was someone I knew very well. Rodney Moore AKA Rodney Sayers. Rodney Sayers began his teaching career at the Petersville Primary School in Kingstown Park. Later he taught at the Stubbs Government School and the Fair Hall Government School. He went to the same secondary school as I did. Even as teenagers I could tell Rodney Sayers was someone who would never allow boredom to invade any social gathering. Rodney Sayers kept us laughing. But he also had a great academic mind, especially in the area of mathematics and numeracy.

I got to know Rodney Sayers even better when both of us attended the St Vincent and the Grenadines Teachers College back in 2001. We were in the same group and shared many wonderful occasions learning pedagogical, social, spiritual and psychological matters pertaining to life and to our profession. I remember returning to the college after a holiday weekend and it was Rodney Sayers who turned to me and said, “Ashford you know Nicholas Pompey drowned yesterday?”

Nicholas Pompey had also attended secondary school with Rodney Sayers and myself. Nicholas Pompey had led his church’s youth group to the Rawacou picnic site the holiday Monday where he and several other young people drowned. Today, I still think of Rawacou as the drowning capital of St Vincent.

My final reflection on Rodney Sayers happened several months after we had left college. After work one evening Rodney Sayers came by as lively as ever. “Ashford, you know Teachers College results come out!” I knew he had meant well but given the nature of the news, I wished he had called me aside and whispered it to me; nonetheless, all my colleagues had heard and were now eagerly demanding that I go and collect my results immediately. Rodney Sayers and I were successful at the teachers college. I last saw Rodney Sayers at one of our local supermarkets about a month before he died. We were both shopping and chatted briefly. Never in the world did I realize that that was the last time we were talking on this side of life.

Another teacher who died this past school year was a principal from one of the schools on the leeward side of mainland St Vincent. Grocina Walters-Richards was the person in charge of the Troumaca Government School. I never knew her in person but her biological brother and I are good friends and we were actually teaching at the same school when his sister died.

The final teacher being mentioned is Ezekiel “Scatter” Butcher. “Scatter” was really a living legend. He actually taught Rodney Sayers and myself when we were in secondary school. Interestingly, “Scatter” and Rodney had very similar jovial temperaments and, coincidentally enough, they both died exactly one month apart from each other.

Read an earlier post where I paid sterling tribute to Ezekiel “Scatter” Butcher.

I believe this post is warranted. However, there are still quite a few Vincentian teachers alive today who are confirmed seriously ill. They are suffering in particular  with cancer and kidney disease. Given the number of teacher deaths this past school year, it is probably a good idea for a national analysis of teacher lifestyles as far as they relate to healthy living or the lack thereof. Could it also be that our Vincentian teachers are unknowingly exposed to some hazardously life-threatening environmental conditions in their respective workplace? Each of us as teachers as  well must begin to value our health, learn how to manage stress factors and to eat natural foods. Let’s support, pray, empathize and help our teachers avoid another deadly school year for Vincentian teachers.

Recently, I read an opinion piece in our local online newspaper which vehemently suggested that the modern day church had been defeated in its attempts to resist or squash the seemingly growing lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT)movement around the world. The author of that moot felt that the church over the years had shown some willingness to adapt to the changing times by its changing interpretation of the Holy Bible. Furthermore, the author opined that if the church is to have any future in our 21st century world then it must once again show its ability to compromise, and in this case, formally accept and partner with the LGBT community.

Opinions are subjective positions and one must readily understand that any opinion which is being heard, read or other wise communicated will most likely seem to be true and factual. But an opinion, no matter how well reasoned or researched is just that–an opinion.

There is a labyrinth of positions and  arguments on this highly contemporary issue that it is hard to decide where to start explaining one’s own views and ultimate belief principles on this hot-seat topic. But since the opinion piece which piqued this blog post addressed the question of whether or not the church should accept defeat and homosexual lifestyles, perhaps it is justified for me to start there.

I don’t think the writer of that article would have understood or grasped the Christian concept of the church as established by Jesus. The Church which Jesus died to birth on earth is actually His body and so it has His power, His will, His purpose, His passion, His determination and His final victory.

So, to put it simply, no the church cannot accept defeat or the LGBT community’s way of life.

Although Jesus established the Church which is powered by a live and direct spiritual feed to His Father, the Church is also the embodiment of sinfully flawed human beings who so easily step out of living by the Spirit to accommodate the benefits of the flesh. And therein is the problem which I believe has blurred the vision of that myopic writer.

People’s understanding and conceptualization of the church is very different from what Jesus’ definition is. Christians go to church but going to church does not make the church goer a Christian.

LGBT flag

LGBT flag

Homosexuality and all the passions of same sex promoters are the smoke from people’s burning sexual desires which stem from the concept of sexual identity. And sexual identity was created by God and, like sex, our sexual identity is perfectly established in our beings. The problem is that we no longer want to depend on God and His Son  Jesus Christ to help us strengthen and define our God given sexual identity.

What am I saying? I am saying that homosexuality and the LGBT magnetism is an erotic bandwagon which every human being has the inner resolve, responsibility and right to say no to. Just as we discipline ourselves to denounce dietary sweetness of sugar, salt, fatty and oily foods, it is the same way we need to observe a proper sexual diet. We must master our desires and depend on God to transform and strengthen our sexual identity into what His original plan was–and still is.

One man married to one woman for as long as they both shall live.

God is fully aware of each man’s freedom of choice; however, He knows what He has put in  each of us and we have what it takes to do the right thing–if we really want to. Sin’s fallen nature is a really terrible curse. God has revealed that our sexual desires  are meant to serve as opportunities by which we control our bodies. To feel you want to be sexually involved with someone of the same sex is not a sin. In fact the Bible teaches that no temptation is sin. It is acting on the temptation that is the sin.

And the world of the LGBT community has been acting on a most tantalizing temptation. In heaven’s eyes they are sinning. But they don’t see it as sinning. They see it as a basic human right which no one has the right to discourage. D’Angelo Antoine, a young Dominican computer programmer and promising scholar puts it nicely when he says that “lesbians, gay, bi-sexual, transgender people are suffering from moral hallucination.”

Listen carefully. This is why my argument is to be accepted. The God of the Holy Bible, who gave us our heterosexual desires and who instituted marriage as being between a man and a woman, does condemn the actions of homosexuality and LGBT lifestyles but…but….He does not ever condemn the person who has been tempted or has lived, or is living,  that lifestyle.

Jesus is documented in the gospels as time and time again forgiving and accepting sexual sinners. In fact, He told the lady they wanted to stone to death because she had illegal and socially unacceptable sex to GO YOUR WAY AND SIN NO MORE.

God does not want the Church to accept the LGBT way of life. He certainly does not want our pastors to be marrying Adam and Steve or Yvette and Eve, but God certainly wants the Church to accept the people who have sinned in this way. They are the ones who need His loving forgiveness and deliverance possibly more than other people.

And herein lies another stumbling block because you see human beings in themselves do not have the capacity to forgive and help sexual sinners. So unless the people in the Church allow God to work from within their own hearts, firmly appreciating that they too have been freely forgiven of their own different sins, they will in no way be able to help homosexuals, lesbians, transgender or queer sinners come to a saving knowledge of Jesus Christ.

But that is exactly what Jesus left the Church to do–to minister to sinners…to the sexually sick and confused who need the sexual identity Maker to operate in their hearts and minds.

FITTING DIAGNOSIS: LGBT people have “moral hallucination” says Dominican computer programmer, D’Angelo Antoine

Recovering smokers, alcoholics, domestic abusers and people with other socially disturbing addictions all have some structured support group which serves as a useful network to stand with them as they overcome their addictions. Lesbians, homosexuals, bisexuals, transgender and every person who is sexually confused or living in the proverbial closet need their configured support group to help them beat their sexual addictions. That is the only way to resolve this sexual warfare.

Remember, the closing verses of the Holy Bible tells us clearly that all sexually immoral people are going to hell. That is non-negotiable, no matter what any promoter, prime minister, privy council or president says.

Legalizing LGBT in every nook and cranny on earth will never solve the problem. Hating, discriminating, fighting, injuring or killing members of the LGBT community will not solve the problem either. At heart is really the survival of the human race via the family unit. Same sex unions cannot reproduce. However, do you know that there are heterosexual unions which also are dealing with the reproductive problem the same way that same sex unions deal with it?

Think about it. In the 21st century, “independent” men and women are now donating their sperms and eggs to scientific labs where conception and growth of human babies are happening outside the woman’s womb.

And the battle to clone human body parts is not making the situation any easier. So the LGBT and same sex marriages are just aspects of a bigger global threat to the human family and its future extinction. I think this post warrants a part 2, but let me stop here for now.

I was one of the more than seven million persons who was touched by the above video of convict Arthur Booth crying uncontrollably in a courtroom when he realized that his judge, Mindy Glazer, was his childhood classmate when both of them were innocent and had their full lives ahead of them. It was thirty five odd years before this emotionally unplanned or unwanted reunion but back in school, like any human being, they  had the possibility of becoming anything they wanted.

One of the sad truths about life that came home to me as I read the background story of Arthur Booth and Mindy Glazer is that life does move on, whether or not one is prepared for the future. The schoolboy  Arthur Booth was shown to be exceptionally gifted in Science and Mathematics. His family and friends recall that Arthur Booth wanted to grow up and become a neurosurgeon. Mindy Glazer’s ambition was to become a lawyer.

But only one of these two beautifully intelligent children was able to fulfil their life’s dreams.

What went wrong for Arthur Booth?

His personal love and desire for the thrill of gambling subtly led him to petty theft which ultimately coerced him into an addicted user of crack cocaine. Arthur Booth dropped out of school at age seventeen. He was in  grade 11 or Form 4 as it is known in my part of the world.

The second life lesson I mournfully  grasped from Arthur Booth’s life story is that success itself is not final just because you have had a good life which has positioned you to be a success. By that same token, the opposite is equally true. Because a person’s life began with poverty, “bad luck” or fewer opportunities than normal people, it does not mean that such persons are doomed to a life of failure.

People with good plans or dreams for their future must quickly recognize, identify and eliminate their specific life distractors which are meant to  sabotage, derail and destroy  their best laid plans and their very future.

Now at age 49, Arthur Booth has spent more than half his life in prison. In fact, though the judge was his friend in school, and sympathized with him, she had to follow the law and impose a $43 000 bond on “the best kid” she remembers from their days in school. Unfortunately, Arthur Booth’s family cannot afford to pay the bond and so, even as this post is being composed, Arthur Booth is still behind bars.

Saddd…

A third life lesson that Arthur Booth’s life story has brought home to me is the recollection of our spiritual heritage and truths. That is,  God has created us with all good things necessary for our best successful life. From a wonderful planet to personal skills, we are all positioned by God to achieve a very good purpose. That purpose is made even more realistic and attainable when we accept the forgiveness, eternal life and empowerment found in God’s Son, Jesus Christ, our Saviour, Lord and soon-to-be Judge.

However, God’s archenemy, Satan, contrives to present every life with seemingly tasty, harmless and innocent distractions. These are the agents of our demise and anti-future manipulators. It really is true that there is a way which seems right to a man but the end thereof are the ways of death. None of us will ever achieve our goals if we do not abandon our own desires for immediate fun and pleasure satisfaction.

The future is there for those who value it more than the present.

People who become failures often sacrifice their future so that they can enjoy themselves  in the present. But successful people do the opposite. They sacrifice their present for their future. In other words, successful people accept present day inconvenience, hard work, even boredom and loneliness, so that their future will be filled with enjoyment because their dreams have come true.

A  primary reason I started this blog was to establish a forerunner to the dream of being a published author. It’s now as I reflect that, by focusing on some pettifogging present day “needs”, I have been distracted in the pursuit of that particular dream. I thank Arthur Booth for serving as a timely wake up and re-evaluation for my own aspirations. So on the tenth anniversary of my mother’s death, I shall be launching my first published literary work.

People around the world have been wishing Arthur Booth well. They really hope he can turn his life around. One of the few good things about his imprisonment so far has been that he has been able to kick his addiction to cocaine. He now needs to rid his life of his gambling addictions. With God on the inside and good friends and family on the outside, Arthur Booth can still change.

We all can change.

Let’s all start today by recognizing simple actions and sacrifices we can and must make to make our inevitable future the one where the dreams in our hearts and minds can finally live in our days and nights. I hope you, too, will take away some inspirationally life-changing lessons from Arthur Booth’s life story.

Not too long ago, news broke here in St Vincent and the Grenadines of the historically shocking hacking of our government’s website by the Islamic State of Iraqi and Syria (I.S.I.S.) military group. Anyone with access or interest in world affairs over the last  year will definitely have heard of the proliferation of horrendous and wantonly inhumane geographical conquests of ISIS in the Middle East. They started as a  little known, barely visible group of militants who were taking away towns and cities from the shaky democratic government in Iraqi. When they began to increase their borders and inch ever closer to Iraqi’s capital city of Baghdad, the international media and stake holders in peace in the Middle East began to take note.

global ISIS

Perhaps if ISIS was just capturing cities and governing them in some semblance of reasonable human control things would not be so bad; however, here is a group that not only overthrows democratically elected governments but also tortures, enslaves, dismembers and kills multitudes of ordinary citizens in the process. They especially terrorize and literally destroy minority groups such as Christians living among the populations which they now govern. Many villages and neighbourhoods in ISIS strongholds have become prime examples of ghost towns brandishing public signs of ISIS ownership and quarantine.

While ISIS has been wielding its deadly fist in the MIddle East, its next of kin, Boko Haram, has turned many villages in Nigeria, Africa,  into the citizens worst nightmares. Maybe the one act of  Boko Haram which is most renown is  its nocturnal kidnapping of approximately two hundred teenage girls from a boarding school. That happened well over a year ago now. In the months that followed this tragedy, several of the girls managed to escape from the forested areas where they were being held captives. It must also be pointed out that all the girls were students at a Christian school. So they were specifically targeted.

Boko Haram’s leader public bragged in subsequent speeches how the girls were converted to Islam and married off to their soldiers. While the world was up in arms over the girls’ capture, the Nigerian government admitted that they had located the girls but lacked the military man power to rescue them. In a sad twist of development, several Nigerian soldiers had to be cour marshalled for their refusal to follow orders and fight against Boko Haram on the grounds that the Boko Haram soldiers were of the same tribe as they were.

Eventually about half of the girls were rescued and the media reported that almost all of them were either pregnant of were expectant mothers.

Through all of this, Boko Haram continues to blow up building and people while kidnapping more women and children across regions of Africa.

But let’s return now to the Caribbean. One may wonder what any of these developments across the Atlantic has to do with us here in the Caribbean. But after the alleged hacking of our government’s website by ISIS I began to wonder the what ifs. It’s almost certain that groups such as ISIS and Boko Haram are always looking for new territories and populations where they can  spread their violent fingers of death, deprivation, incarceration and destruction. Does ISIS or Boko Haram have covert plans to unexpectedly invade one or more of the Caribbean islands.

Maybe terrorists, too, are looking for the perfect getaway destination to set up a new camp. Hmmm.

The Caribbean History shows that in times past an innocent people who occupied these quietly serene lands, were violently ousted and killed by another set of visitors in the form of the war-like Caribs. Yes, we have all the technological tracking and warning systems but how tangible a support will that be in the event of a dead-of-night crossing o the ocean and visit by ISIS or Boko Haram?

Indeed, for years we in the Caribbean have enjoyed the peaceful exemption from the international troubles of many parts of the world. But this does not mean that we should still hold a reactionary policy. I think this is one case in point when we will do well to take heed and see how we can help protect our islands’ security. And Boko Haram’s visit need not be a sudden one-time event. Are our government’s immigration resources keeping astute checks of who may be entering our islands, their past travel history or connections to terrorist groups and terrorist safe-zones?

In the 21st century the onus is on us to actively defend and protect our rights and freedoms as individuals and as a people.

wefmnews

Thursday August 14, 2014 — WEFM — Four schools in St. Vincent and the Grenadines have recorded percentage pass rates of 80% or more in this year’s CSEC exams.

 

These schools are Girls’ High School (96.96%); St. Joseph Convent Kingstown (93.68%); St. Vincent Grammar School (93.03%) and Thomas Saunders Secondary (85.27%).

 

Ten Schools obtained creditable pass rates between 60 and 80%.

 

These are St. Martin’s Secondary School (78.20%); St. Joseph Convent Marriaqua (78.16%); Adelphi Secondary School (75.88%); Mountain View Adventist Academy (73.66%); Union Island Secondary School (70.62%); West St. George Secondary (67.27%); Intermediate High School (65.93%); Central Leeward Secondary (64.56%); North Union Secondary (63.99%) and Bishop’s College Kingstown (63.14%).

 

The school which recorded the most significant improvement is the St. Martin’s Secondary whose pass rate increased from 54.95% in 2013 to 78.20% in 2014, an increase of 23.25%.

 

 

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The vast majority of Vincentians alive today remember the events leading up to the Grand Beach Accord that paved the way for general elections in 2001, ending an historic reign as government for the New Democratic Party (N.D.P.) which began in 1984.

Whether or not you are a person intrigued by politics, or you are an independent observer you have to give Jack his jacket and admit that the NDP’s seventeen year run as a governing party ushered in a new era in St Vincent and the Grenadines (SVG).

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Newly sworn in Prime Minister James Mitchell in 1984

It was during this time in our history that the transition occurred which brought our country in step with the majority of other developing nations in the region and around the globe.

Led by its founder, James Mitchell, the NDP took the office of government a mere five years after we achieved political independence from Britain. In fact, it was the St Vincent Labour Party (SVLP) led by incumbent Prime Minister Robert Milton Cato, that the New Democratic Party overwhelmingly deprived of another term in office.

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From Prime Minister to Opposition Leader: Milton Cato makes his way to Parliament after his defeat in the 1984 elections

It stands to reason, therefore, that the then Milton Cato government must have been deficient in the provision of certain key political and economic indicators for the citizens of SVG. James Mitchell, back then a relatively youthful man with a vision for national development, courageously took the oath of Prime Minister for this young multi-island state.

The NDP’s tenure will certainly be remembered for the many widespread capital projects and infrastructural changes which they pioneered. Every nook and cranny on the mainland and in the Grenadines benefited from one of the many hundreds of rural concrete roads which they cut and/or paved.

In 1984 the NDP won 9 of the 13 parliamentary seats up for grabs. When the electorate went back to the polls in 1989, Vincentians gave the James Mitchell government an overall grade of A+. All  fifteen constituencies went to the New Democratic Party. The NDP had split two constituencies on the grounds that the geographical area was too wide for the respective individual representatives to adequately represent in parliament and for timely executed projects.

Take a look at the candidates who contested the July 25, 1984, general elections on the NDP ticket, as they appeared back in 1984.

 

IMG_20140804_133115    IMG_20140804_133121   IMG_20140804_133130

IMG_20140804_133154      IMG_20140804_133252   IMG_20140804_133327

IMG_20140804_133346         IMG_20140804_133402     IMG_20140804_133434

IMG_20140804_133444           IMG_20140804_133501       IMG_20140804_135557

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Images courtesy the Vincentian newspaper at SVG National Archives

MH17 as captured by a passenger who died when it was shot down just 3 hours after this picture was taken

MH17 as captured by a passenger who died when it was shot down just 3 hours after this picture was taken

 

This summer is not yet  over but the world has witnessed the loss of hundreds of lives from plane tragedies within a short space of time. Malaysia Airlines has been particularly unlucky in this regard since two of its fifteen large airplanes have been involved. On March 8th, Malasia flight MH370 just vanished into thin air and has not been heard or seen since, despite the massively expensive international search that was done for it. Then, just as passengers thought it was safe to continue flying with Malaysia Airlines, their MH17 flight was allegedly blown out of the sky by a BUK surface-to-air missile over Ukraine on Thursday July 17, 2014.

Both of these flights were carrying more than 200 persons. In fact, MH17 is said to have a confirmed passenger list of 298 persons. Although it is widely accepted that flying is the safest means of  traveling, such incidents make you stop and wonder.

Apart from these two instances involving Malaysia Airlines, there were two other plane crashes. In fact they happened on two consecutive days. So, all in all, there were three plane crashes in one week. Each of them being quite deadly. A plane crashed while trying to land on a small island after leaving Taiwan. Of the fifty four or so persons on board, approximately forty six of them died.

The very next day, a plane carrying one hundred and six passengers crashed after leaving Ouagadougou Bakina Faso in West Africa.  It had tried to fly around some bad weather, possibly sand storms as it was crossing the Sahara desert. From the scene of the crash site officials concluded that no one lived through that.

Flying is a luxury that is worth the money invested in each ticket, but it is also a situation where each passenger volunteers to board a potential coffin. For as soon as flight attendants close that door from the inside, it is not going to open again until the plane lands. And all things must go smoothly for a plane to land and come to a  complete stop.

All of these incidents are plane tragedies and have affected many families. But the alleged shooting down of MH17 is particularly hard to accept simply because it is a tragedy that humans could have prevented. One mournful mother told about how one of her two sons who died aboard MH17 had ran back from the immigration to tell her that he loved her. He then asked a puzzling question. “What happens when the plane crash and I die?”

That mother would give anything to turn back the hands of time.

But what’s done is done.That plane with just under three hundred persons on board was flying at 33 000 feet. Because missiles can explode near their targets, it is relatively safe to assume that some passengers were alive after the plane broke up due to the explosion. Some passengers might also have been asleep, which is customary on long flights. This plane crashed three hours into an eleven hour flight.

Talk about your worst nightmare! Can you imagine what it feels like to see and feel your plane suddenly and noisily break apart? The wind suddenly knocks out your breath even as you try to scream. And while you are coming to terms with that horror you realize you have a worse situation because now you start to fall to the ground.

Persons who visited the large crash area spoke of seeing some passengers still in their seats with the seat-belts buckled. Others saw passengers who had no clothes on because as they were falling the air would have been such unrelenting force that it blew their holiday clothing right off. One report spoke of how sixteen passengers had broken into eighty seven pieces and their body parts were scattered all over the crash site.

There were babies falling from the sky. There were teenagers and young adults who became like Superman, only that gravity was their deadly kryptonite. There were elderly persons who fell from the clouds and hit the ground with such deadly force that their skeletons disintegrated.

Certainly, those who were asleep were the lucky ones. And those whose weak hearts gave out before they hit the unwelcoming ground were perhaps lucky as well. While the sufferings of the passengers and crew may have ended, it was just the first installment in a horror saga for their relatives and friends.

Dead bodies stayed in the sun for three days. Luggage and personal items, especially valuables, were stolen from the dead passengers. Bodies started to rot and to stink in the hot July sun. No country felt it as much as the Netherlands of whom 154 passengers were its citizens.

Planes continue to fly every hour but every time that door closes before take-off it is almost certain that every passenger would be wondering if they will see when it opens next.

 

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