{The above video shows how one Vincentian news reader reacted when one of the earthquakes struck as the newscast was being recorded.}

 

 

Six earthquakes were reported in the (Eastern) Caribbean on Thursday.

According to a statement from the UWI Seismic Research Centre, the earthquakes occurred North East of Barbados at 07:01am, 7:52am, 11:16am, 11:29am, 11:36am and 12:23pm local time.

“The events were located between latitudes of 13.83°N to 13.99°N and longitudes of 58.51°W to 58.70°W. The Magnitudes ranged from 3.4 to 6.4 and depths from 61km to 111km. These earthquakes were reported felt throughout in Barbados, St. Vincent, Grenada, Dominica, Trinidad and Tobago and Guyana.”

No damage or injuries were reported to the Seismic Research Centre.

Seismologist Dr. Joan Latchman said the faults in the earth are now ready to release the strained energy, causing earthquakes to occur more frequently.

She urged citizens to be prepared for earthquakes of greater Magnitudes as she said people tend to forget that the region is seismically alive.

“We have not seen our largest earthquake for more than a hundred years and we keep saying that we need to be prepared. We need to be prepared at all levels – from the individual to the community, to the region, to the national, to the Eastern Caribbean.”

via Caribbean region struck by 6 earthquakes.

 

Below is my opinion based on the above news release

Actually, during the latter part of last year (2014) over 2o different tremors or earthquakes were recorded in the Eastern Caribbean. The data always show the epicenter to be somewhere NE of Barbados or St Lucia, or within an approximate range of the Windward Islands. It is my opinion that the pressure within the earth’s tectonic plate, just NE of the Eastern Caribbean is reaching a pressure pot release point. Also troubling is the presence of many sleeping volcanoes within the Windward Islands as well.

Here in St Vincent & the Grenadines we last felt a relatively intense earthquake back on Thursday November 29, 2007, at approximately 3 PM. As God’s favour would have had it, although things were thoroughly shaken, there was no human injuries or loss of life. That particular quake registered 7.3 on the Richter scale.

As we are particularly vulnerable to earth movements, we must do the wisely astute thing and put in place community and village-level earthquakes and/or volcanic event responses so as to minimize panic and ensure the greatest possible safety of our ordinary citizens should the Eastern Caribbean suffer an unwanted catastrophic earthquake. Let’s make sure every citizen group knows what to do before, during and after such an event.